Standing Woman No 1 by Lynn Chadwick

Year
1987
Medium
Bronze
Size
11.5 × 4 × 3 inches
29.2 × 10.2 × 7.6 cm
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About the Work

This bronze figure of a woman, 11.5 inches high, by British sculptor Lynn Chadwick was conceived in 1987, and cast by Pangolin Editions in an edition of 9. It is stamped with the artist's monogram and numbered 1/9. The bronze has a black patina and polished face. Lynn Russell Chadwick, one of the leading sculptors of post-war Britain, trained initially as a draughtsman and worked in an architectural firm. After the war, during which he served as a pilot, Chadwick made a living making exhibition stands and designs for textiles and furniture. He created his first mobile around 1947 and commissions followed from architects, private businesses and the Arts Council of Great Britain. Breaking with the tradition of carving sculpture from wood or stone, Chadwick welded iron, steel and bronze rods into expressionistic, sculptures inspired by the human form, insects and animals that approach abstraction. He later produced works that were editions cast in bronze. Chadwick's sculptures were seen to reflect a post-war aesthetic that was described by critic Herbert Read in the 1952 Venice Biennale catalogue New Aspects of British Sculpture. Read wrote of Chadwick's work against the backdrop of the Cold War incorporating passages from T. S. Eliot's epic poem, The Waste Land: "Here are images of flight, of ragged claws 'scuttling across the floors of silent seas'..." Chadwick was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire, French Officier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and Royal Academician. His works are held in major institutions including the Centre Georges Pompidou, the Tate Gallery, the Albright Knox Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Israel Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, and many more. Literature: Lynn Chadwick, Galeria Freites, Caracas, 1988; Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Caracas, 1990; Far and Chadwick, Lynn Chadwick Sculptor, Stroud, 1997, p.364

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