Two for Tea by Tanya Lyons

Year
2010
Medium
Solid Worked Glass & Brass Mesh
Size
43 × 46 × 12 inches
109.22 × 116.84 × 30.48 cm
$6800
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About the Work

Flame worked glass, brass mesh, tea cups, cotton, wildflower tea. After graduating from Sheridan College, Lyons developed her concepts at The Atlin Art Centre in Atlin, British Columbia. After returning to Toronto, Ontario to continue her work in glass, she moved to Toyama, Japan where she completed a one -year graduate program at The Toyama Institute of Glass Art. The work she created in Toyama reflected a personal transformation that she experienced in Japan. She returned to Canada and continued to work as a glass artist at the Harbourfront Centre, as well as teaching part time in the glass studio at Sheridan College. Since then, Lyons moved to Montreal to develop new work and explore her ideas of sculptural glass. Her work has been exhibited at the Canadian Clay and Glass Museum, Galerie Elena Lee, the Sandra Ainsley Gallery, SOFA Chicago, the McCord Museum, the Morgan Contemporary Glass Museum of Pittsburgh, the Republic of Korea Glass from Canada exhibition, and the Cheongiu International Craft Biennale. It can be found in public collections in Luxemburg, Germany, Canada and the United States. " I started making life size glass dresses to express the idea of changing how you feel as simply as changing your clothes. Thinking about how different clothing can affect how we feel, I chose the dress form with the idea of dressing up, or coming out of our day to day. As I continue to work on the dresses, I want to look closely at the effects our clothes have on ourselves and those around us, using glass to reflect the multitude of styles and emotions clothing can project or create. Looking at how our clothing can be a shell or a shield, drawing in or pushing away those who surround us. As well as reflecting on how the clothing affects the wearer and the viewer. I feel these necessary objects of our daily lives are perfect to reflect on life, society and the emotions that fill us every day. Especially since clothing has become such a powerful statement in our society for who we are and who we want to be. So they become pieces that hold character, personality and emotion. Shells one’s mind could slip into. As a continuation in this concept and theme of clothing, I decided to reflect back on my time of living in Japan and make metal mesh and glass Kimono’s that hang on the wall. Japanese have traditionally used their Kimono’s to express different aspects about the wearer. I found this idea very interesting as well as being drawn to the simple but very striking form with the notion of every Kimono basically having the same form and size for everyone with adjustments only happening in the folds as one puts one on. The Kimono has been worn traditionally and in the day to day for a very long time giving a great history and tradition to the form as well as making them a perfect canvas to express thoughts and conceptual landscapes. This work as well as new work that has been developing is about escapism and change. Questioning our identity as we move in constant motion in a society that has taken us to a state where we require drastic change. My work represents what we surround our selves with and for survival I see the need to return to nature." Tanya Lyons